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Help for Military Rape and Sexual Assault Victims


Note: If you are reading this article because you have just been raped or assaulted, please scroll down.

An outfit called AfterDeployment.org has rolled out a helpful tool to help individuals, male or female, who have been the victim of a sexual assault or rape while in the military.

The website features a self-assessment tool to walk the user through the most common symptoms of what we now call military sexual trauma. It only takes a few minutes. The tool prompts the user to rate the severity of a number of common symptoms in their own case.

At the end of the assessment, the user receives a numerical score gauging the severity of their symptoms as a result of the experience.

One of the great things about the site is that at the end of the assessment, the servicemember can click on a button to get immediately transferred to a benefits advisor, a peer veteran, or other helping professional. It’s confidential, and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

According to the Service Women’s Action Network, the military received 3,192 reports of sexual assaults against its members – the overwhelming majority of which were assaults against women. An unknown number of assaults go unreported.

If You Have Been Raped

If you find this article because you are a victim of rape or sexual assault within the military, the Military Rape Crisis Center, a non-profit, privately funded organization that exists to help guide and support military sex assault victims has the following advice:

  • Don’t shower or brush your teeth. Don’t change clothes or drink water. Go to the hospital as you are. Do your best to preserve as much evidence as you can.
  • Consider being examined with a rape kit even if you do not intend on reporting it. The evidence will be there if you change your mind. It may also help you document a PTSD or disability claim in the future with the VA once you are discharged.
  • Take photos of any injuries you received. If you don’t go to the hospital, take the photos yourself, if you can, or have a friend help you take them. Again, the photographs may be useful documentation later if you want to apply for disability compensation from the VA.

Additionally, the Military Rape Crisis Center recommends storing any evidence of the rape or sexual assault, such as photographs, off base. The center suspects that there have been some incidents of higher-ranking servicemembers abusing their authority by accessing military housing or work areas to destroy evidence.

A list of rape crisis centers and support resources on or near active duty military installations is available here.

You can also call (800) 656-HOPE, or visit the online sexual assault hotline here. Organizers assure us that your privacy and confidentiality will be protected.

About AfterDeployment.org

Afterdeployment.org is intended to provide a resource to veterans who are trying to deal with all kinds of issues related to returning home from deployment. In addition to the sexual trauma assessment and referral tool, the site also features similar assessment tools to help soldiers with the following issues:

  • Alcohol and drug abuse
  • Anger management
  • Anxiety
  • Caregiver stress
  • Depression
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Marital issues
  • Parenting
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder and a number of other issues.

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